A Coalition of Angry Moms Want Congress to Fix the EPA

Moms from the environmental activism arm of Van Jones' Dream Corps mobilized for climate justice in D.C.

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NOW THIS: This Flint mom warns us what could happen with a bare bones EPA

According to this Flint mom, Flint is a shiny example of what could happen to American people in any city with a bare bones EPA. Hear what she has to say about proposed funding cuts. Then join her in the fight against EPA budget cuts at: greenforall.org/notonourwatch

 


The 51 U.S. Senators Who Voted for a Budget that Could Send More Kids to Hospitals

OCTOBER 18, 2017 -- Today in Washington D.C., the U.S. Senate voted to pass a budget proposal that would slash funding for critical environmental protections, open up drilling in the Arctic, and in summary, put people's health and well-being at risk. Gutting funding for clean air and water protection programs puts Americans at serious risk. One Flint mom, Melissa Mays, warned earlier this month that a bare bones Environmental Protection Agency could leave cities across America susceptible to becoming the next #FlintWaterCrisis.  

So... who are the 51 Senators who voted for this #DirtyBudget that could send kids and our elders to the hospital? See below.

There's still time to introduce an amendment to protect EPA funding. 

  • Ask all Senators to step up and protect our right to clean air & water by introducing an amendment to #ProtectEPA funding. Use #AFutureToFightFor.

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5 Principles of Effective Carbon Pricing

The social cost of carbon pollution is not zero. Therefore, we shouldn't be charging zero to polluters who put poison and pollution into our air. But there's a right way to do carbon pricing and there's a wrong way. There's a way that uplifts all communities, and there's a way that leaves some behind. Download our 5 Principles for Effective Carbon Pricing to learn more:

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Then check out our Carbon Price & Invest section for a wealth of resources to get started in your community.


Clean Power For All Toolkits

The Obama Administration issued the first-ever rule limiting pollution from power plants. Despite the Trump Administration's efforts to now dismantle this rule, cities and states across the country are looking for ways to move forward on climate goals and get our pollution in check. The Clean Power For All Toolkits are exactly what every policymaker needs to get started. Learn how to design and implement carbon pollution reduction goals in a way that is fair and just to even the most underserved communities. 

Our toolkits are the product of a healthy amount of collaboration with more than 10 national nonprofit partners and three universities.

We cover topics ranging from community engagement in policy design, to ways to make polluters pay, investments in underserved communities, green job creation, just transition for affected workers, and false solutions!

>>>DOWNLOAD ALL SEVEN (7) TOOLKITS HERE<<<

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Vien Truong shares her powerful story in Green For All mini-documentary series

Green For All director Vien Truong travelled the country this summer to talk to moms raising their kids on the frontlines of pollution in America. But first, hear her own story about being raised in Oakland, CA in the 80s and raising her twin toddlers there now, in the city that she loves.  

The truth is, pollution is rampant in low-income neighborhoods and in communities of color all across the country. Due to their proximity to the dirtiest sources of pollution like power plants and busy freeways and highways, these communities have higher rates of asthma and pollution-related disease, including cancer. And in the midst of all of this, the Trump Administration wants to cut funding for environmental protections by nearly ONE THIRD. 

Sign our petition to protect critical funding for clean air, clean water, and a safe environment today. 

Everyone has a story. What's yours? Share it with Green For All at info@greenforall.org. Use subject line "My Story - YOUR NAME."


ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AWARDS: Van Jones presents award to Russell Simmons for green activism

On September 23rd in Los Angeles, Hollywood filmmakers, producers and celebrities came together to celebrate the industry elite who are helping to bring environmental issues to mass culture. Green For All's co-founder Van Jones, director Vien Truong, and deputy director Michelle Romero, were honored to be there to support our friends at the Environmental Media Association. This was EMA's 27th award show dedicated to highlighting the industry's efforts on environmental issues, and it was tremendous.

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Pictured above: LEFT - Michelle Romero, Van Jones, Vien Truong; MIDDLE - Vien Truong, Nikki Reed, Carter Oosterhouse, Amy Smart, Michelle Romero; RIGHT - Michelle Romero, Natalie Portman, Vien Truong

With Jaden Smith hosting, and our friend Mary Ann Hitt of the Sierra Club opening the evening, things were off to a great start. The 2017 honorees included Natalie PortmanRussell SimmonsJohn Paul DeJoria and former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg. 

And of course, Van was honored to present the award to Russell Simmons, a man who -- among his many great contributions to culture and social issues -- supported Green For All's #FixThePipes campaign earlier this year, to help raise money for families in Flint who are still suffering from the #FlintWaterCrisis. Watch now:

 

Follow the Environmental Media Association on Facebook and Twitter for more.

POLITIC 365: Moms Mobilize: Using Power of Women to Advance Climate Justice

Courtesy of Politic365.

 

Vien Truong is no stranger to the climate justice movement. A long-time resident of Oakland, California, environmental equity is an abiding passion for the CEO of Dream Corps and leader of Green For All.  Nationally praised for her work developing energy and environmental policy, “this work has been personal for my whole life,” Truong told Politic365 in an exclusive interview.  “I grew up in a community that was considered one of the poorest and most polluted communities in the country – East Oakland, California. And because of the zip code in which I live, my kids and I are projected to live 12 years less than a more affluent family just seven miles away. We have higher lead poisoning in the community here than in Flint, Michigan. So for me, all of this is very real and very personal.”

The personal impact of how environmental issues affect communities across the country is what Truong and Green for All are hoping to tap in to with Moms Mobilize, a campaign to “bring together Moms from around the country to fight devastating cuts to our environmental protections being proposed by the Trump Administration.”

From the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, to the crippling affects of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and now Maria, the impact of climate change and global warming are real, says Truong. “What’s happening all across the country is that people are starting to see that these attacks on the climate movement have a real, tangible impact,” Truong said. And “the one agency – the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – that is supposed to protect our air and water, and protect us from these massive devastations,” she continued, “is the very agency that Donald Trump’s Head of the EPA is trying to dismantle [by] proposing a one-third budget cut this fall. That is just unacceptable.”

On Wednesday, September 27, #MomsMobilize is taking its message to Capitol Hill, hosting a day of action in Washington, D.C. to oppose any congressional roll-backs in funding for the EPA.  While the campaign is all about motivating everyday women to get more involved in the climate movement, several notable personalities have joined the cause as well, including Frances FisherMegan BooneAmy SmartAlfre WoodardAli WongAngie MartinezBozama “Boz” Saint JohnCheryl Contee, and Elianne Ramos.

“The blessing and curse of the moment is that for too long we have seen the Climate Movement be painted as an elitist, White thing, but we’re beginning to see the very visceral impact this will have to families in Flint, to families in Houston, to families in East Oakland and across the country,” said Truong. “People of color are really the ones who can’t afford to relocate and move out when these things happen.”

Women are key to the battle to protect the EPA and improve climate justice because, as Truong said, “women have an amazing power to influence not only the market, but also politics and policies. They have this often untapped power around how they spend their dollars, but also, non-college educated women in the United States have a huge ability to impact the direction of this country.”

“We give life,” she said, “and we can also use our power to protect life, and I think that’s what this campaign is all about for Green For All.”

#MomsMobilize is “bringing together moms from Flint, Las Vegas, Oakland, and other places around the country to say we’re done with the fighting. It’s not about being Anti-Trump, it’s about being for our kids and the future we want to live in.”

In encouraging women to join the Mom’s campaign, Truong’s message is clear – “When I talk to people in this country, oftentimes they say they’re tired of hearing politics. They’re tired of turning on CNN and hearing the political back and forth because it undermines the importance of issues and the reality of the things they’re facing. So our campaign with Moms is to say: it doesn’t matter who you voted for in the last election, let’s vote for solutions.”

To sign the #MomsMobilize petition, or support Green For All’s movement, visit the campaign website to learn more about ways you can get involved.

 

Original story appeared on Politic 365 on September 19, 2017. Read the story here.


TeleSUR: Women in the U.S. demand Trump to act on climate change [EN ESPAÑOL]

Courtesy of TeleSUR tv


[EN ESPAÑOL] Mothers in U.S. reject cuts to the EPA

Courtesy of TeleSUR TV

NOW THIS: Mothers are fighting for environmental justice because Trump won't

Green For All brought moms from around the country to Washington D.C. -- and it was powerful. These women are fighting for environmental justice because President Trump won't. Thank you to Congresswoman Barbara Lee (CA), Nanette Diaz Barragán (CA), Pramila Jayapal (WA), Sheila Jackson Lee (TX), and Tulsi Gabbard (HI) for standing with us. 

Support our moms by signing our petition at greenforall.org/notonourwatch

Watch this video to hear why this fight matters.

 


Van Jones Releases New Book Offering a Path Forward

The Trump Administration announced the repeal of the Clean Power Plan today. Van Jones reminds people that clean energy was once a bipartisan issue. Clean energy does not kill jobs. Degregulation of power plants will kill people though.

Click on the photo to watch Van on CNN New Day, then buy his new book BEYOND THE MESSY TRUTH

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Van's new book, BEYOND THE MESSY TRUTH: How We Came Apart, How We Come Together, offers solutions for ending the partisan madness and uniting our country to advance positive change. We are in this together. It's time to start acting like it. 

Buy a copy of Van's book and find tour dates todayhttp://www.randomhousebooks.com/campaign/beyond-the-messy-truth/ 

Want to join a Beyond Messy book club? Sign up at http://lovearmy.org/bookclub


Green For All Statement on Clean Power Plan Repeal

For Immediate Release
Contact: Nina Smith, nina@megaphonestrategies.com301-717-9006 cell
Inaru Melendez, inaru@megaphonestrategies.com413 -331-9530 cell 

Oakland, CA  – Green For All today released the following statement in response to the Trump administration’s announcement that it plans to repeal the EPA’s Clean Power Plan:

“The Trump administration’s proposal to repeal the Clean Power Plan is a direct assault on our lives and children’s futures.

Even as we’ve seen storms destroy communities in Texas, Louisiana, Florida and Puerto Rico, this Administration continues to push dangerous policies that are literally killing our kids. We look to our leaders to safeguard our communities, but all we’re seeing from this administration is more polluter giveaways and zero solutions to our looming climate crisis.

Reckless actions like this put our lives on the line. Dismantling the first and only federal limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants won’t help vulnerable families breathe. Rolling back key protections won’t prevent superstorms or the billions of dollars it takes for communities and economies to recover. Investing in clean energy, keeping our air and water clean, can and will.

Now is the time for action, not outdated ideas that line the pockets of polluters. Green For All will fight to ensure we protect Americans from the dangers of carbon pollution and climate change.  We refuse to allow big money to continue to rob children and vulnerable communities of stronger future we all deserve. Not on our watch.”

Green For All encourages states to move forward in designing their own state clean power plan. We provide toolkits to get started at greenforall.org/thecleanpowerplan.

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Green For All is a climate and economic justice organization working at the intersection of poverty and pollution to create an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty. Green For All is an initiative of The Dream Corps, a social justice accelerator for transformative campaigns, ideas and innovations.


SHONDALAND: Environmental Justice Activist Vien Truong is Fighting For The World

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Boss. Badass. Climate warrior.

Environmental justice activist Vien Truong learned two things as a child: Climate change affects us all, and some people suffer more than others.

When her family arrived in the Bay Area as refugees from war-ravaged Vietnam, her parents didn't speak English and had 11 kids to feed. Truong soon got a crash course in the ill-fated connection between poverty and environmental toxins. “I spent my childhood working in pesticide-filled strawberry fields in California," says Truong. "Later, growing up in Oakland, I saw families like mine suffering terrible health conditions from pollution for generations."

Now her life’s work is "to solve both poverty and pollution" nationwide. She’s accomplishing that as the CEO of the nonprofit social justice accelerator, The Dream Corps, and as the director of its environmental activism arm, Green For All.

Through Green For All, Truong fights to ensure marginalized communities of color are leading the fight to protect the environment. "The families living closest to toxic waste sites, or by busy roads and highways, are often struggling to make ends meet," she says. Training folks for green economy jobs — like installing solar panels or retrofitting buildings so they're more energy efficient — enables people to put food on the table and help make their neighborhoods less polluted.

But Truong, who earned a degree from the University of California’s Hastings College of the Law, also knows that legally enforceable regulations are essential. “One of the accomplishments I am most proud to have co-led is passing [California Senate Bill 535] which takes dollars polluters pay the State of California and reinvests them into the poorest and most polluted communities,” says Truong. "Those dollars went to free solar panels for working families, free bus passes for seniors and students, affordable housing by transit hubs, and much more."

Because Truong believes women are at the heart of ensuring the nation’s leaders address climate change. Green For All’s newest campaign, Moms Mobilize focuses on mothers who are seeing the effects on their children. The campaign, which will culminate with an advocacy day in Washington, D.C., is "bringing together moms and women from all walks of life to tell Congress to act now to fight climate change by doing work before the storms," she says.

Indeed, in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma (and with Jose approaching) Truong says her work with Green For All has taken on a new urgency. But Truong also wants those who aren’t regularly in the path of such disasters to remember that they still need to care about the climate. "Scientists are giving our planet 50 years before Earth expires," she says. "My hometown of Oakland, nestled in the most liberal region in America, is ranked among our nation’s most polluted cities. Climate change hurts all of us — there is no wall high enough to keep the polluted air from blowing into each of our backyards."

Making it easy for people to stay informed and engaged in environmental activism is one of Truong's priorities. To receive updates about clean air, clean water, and climate progress, she says to simply text GREEN to 97483. You can also sign Green For All's petition to urge Congress to fully fund the EPA. But most of all, Truong encourages people to vote. "If local elected officials don’t make [climate] a priority, then show up at the ballot box to hold them accountable," she says. "That is where our power lies, and it’s past time we started using it."


E&E NEWS: Lawmakers, 'warrior women' oppose budget cuts

Lawmakers, 'warrior women' oppose budget cuts

by Arianna Skibell, E&E News reporter

Published: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 in E&E News

 

DSC_0284.jpgPictured above: Vien Truong, director of Green For All, calling on lawmakers, specifically women lawmakers to oppose Trump U.S. EPA budget cuts. 

Lawmakers joined a group of mothers today outside the Capitol to call on Congress to reject President Trump's proposed cuts to U.S. EPA's budget.

Climate activists with the groups Green For All, Moms Clean Air Force and Climate Parents joined Democratic Reps. Nanette Diaz Barragán and Barbara Lee of California and Pramila Jayapal of Washington in urging lawmakers to protect vulnerable children and communities by fully funding the environmental agency.

Lee called the mothers "warrior women," praising them for taking on what she sees as the most pressing issue today. "Nothing is more important right now than the fight to save our environment," Lee said. "[You] are the resistance to this terrible Trump administration agenda, which is so detrimental to our planet."

The White House proposed to slash EPA's budget by 31 percent and sought a roughly 13 percent cut for the Interior Department in fiscal 2018. But Republican and Democratic appropriators in both chambers have said they were uncomfortable with some of the reductions.

The House Appropriations Committee in July approved a $31.4 billion spending bill for EPA, Interior and related agencies, giving them more than $800 million less than in fiscal 2017 but rejecting many of the administration's steeper cuts.

Gretchen Dahlkemper, director of Clean Air Moms Action, a community of more than 1 million parents across the country, said there is a vacuum of climate leadership in Congress that needs to be filled.

"We know as women, as mothers, it's critically important for us to come together and ensure we are protecting the health of our families and the safety of our communities," she said.

Barragán, a member of the House's United for Climate and Environmental Justice Task Force, said global warming and environmental degradation are disproportionately affecting communities of color and marginalized people.

"To see women here today is so very important, because we need to make sure we're standing up for our communities, for our families, because this is a public health crisis," she said.

Dahlkemper said her group has scheduled a slew of meeting with lawmakers today, where she will urge them to take action on climate for the future of the country's children.

 


Moms Mobilize to Protect Funding for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 27, 2017
Contact: Nina Smith, 301-717-9006nina@megaphonestrategies.com
Inarú Melendez, 413-331-9530inaru@megaphonestrategies.com


Green For All, Moms, Reps. Jayapal, Barragán, Lee, Jackson-Lee and Gabbard Lead Day of Action for Climate Justice

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Washington, D.C. -- Rep. Pramila Jayapal (WA-7th District), Rep. Nanette Diaz Barragán (CA-44th District), Rep. Barbara Lee (CA-13th District), Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-2nd District), Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18th District) joined moms and women from all walks of life for a press conference and day of action calling on Congress to get serious about protecting kids and communities by fully funding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Moms Mobilize launched in response to Trump’s proposed historic budget cuts to the EPA, which gut superfund toxic waste sites and undermine critical air and water protections. Members of Congress joined parents fiercely concerned about recent climate disasters including fires raging in the West, hurricanes flooding our communities, and diesel fumes and dirty power plants polluting our air. Together, they pledged their support for restoring critical funding to the EPA. Women, moms, parents and advocates delivered over 300,000 signatures to Congressional offices over the course of the day.

 “The Trump Administration has launched an all-out assault on the EPA and the communities it serves,” said Congresswoman Barbara Lee. “Families across the United States rely on EPA programs to prevent environmental degradation, protect public health, and mitigate the devastating effects of climate change. These safeguards are of particular importance to low-income communities and communities of color, who are more likely to live near pollution and more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. It is up to every one of us to raise our voices and speak out against proposed cuts to the EPA. After all, the long-term health of our families depends upon a healthy planet.”

“It is incumbent on mothers to lead the charge, to speak out, and to force elected officials to put the needs of our planet, our people, and especially our children above partisan posturing and politics as usual,” added Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee.

Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal said, “Congressional Republicans and the Trump administration have made it their mission to beat the EPA down, but we’ve made it our mission to fight back with full force. I’m proud to fight alongside Green For All and Moms Clean Air Force to ensure a safer, better, cleaner future for our kids. We know that big polluters and climate change are hurting kids across the country, especially low-income children and children of color. Fourteen percent of black children have asthma compared to eight percent of their white counterparts. Fetal death rates in Flint, Michigan, increased by 58 percent following the water crisis. Moms always know, and women always know, what side of justice is the right one. It would do big polluters and Republicans in Congress some good to hear our voices, because when it comes to our kids, we won’t be silenced.”

 “Your zip code shouldn’t define the quality of the air you breath or water you drink,” said Congresswoman Nanette Diaz Barragán. “People in my district are relying on the EPA to do its job. Whether it’s lead in our drinking water or carcinogens in our air, my district is facing an environmental public health crisis that’s a danger to people, especially our most vulnerable: our children and seniors. We need to stand up for our families and our communities, because we all deserve clean air and clean water.”

 "We should be putting all of our energy toward leveraging and mobilizing our technological resources to transition to an environmentally-friendly, low carbon economy and reduce the pollution that damages our health, air, and water, and disproportionately affects low-income communities,” said Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard. “Sadly, by arbitrarily slashing the budget of the EPA by one third, we are moving in the wrong direction.  We must dedicate necessary resources to protecting our communities, especially those that bear the brunt of our country's addiction to fossil fuel and climate change.”

“After experiencing the fury of hurricanes Harvey, Irma and now, seeing the devastation in Puerto Rico, Congress and the Trump Administration can no longer deny our climate crisis. That’s why moms and women from all walks of life are coming together to demand that our leaders fully fund the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,” said Vien Truong, CEO of Dream Corps and leader of Green For All. “We cannot wait until the next costly emergency to invest in the future and protections our families deserve. Without it, there will be more Flints, more Brandywines, more Houstons, more San Juans. We won’t let that happen. Not on our watch.”

“Simply put, Trump’s proposed budget cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are ruthlessly irresponsible. They would put the health of our children and the safety of our communities in serious jeopardy by gutting bedrock pollution protections that our families depend on. We can’t risk more asthma attacks, more toxic pollution, and more lead in our children’s drinking water. What’s more, recent hurricanes have reminded us how essential the agency is to the ongoing clean-up of hazardous sites in Texas, Florida and now Puerto Rico. Now is not the time to cripple an agency so critical to our children’s well-being,” said Gretchen Dahlkemper, Director of Special Projects for Moms Clean Air Force, a community of more than 1 million moms and caregivers united in the fight against dangerous air pollution. 

Liz Martin Perera, Climate Policy Director, Federal Policy for Sierra Club, added, "As parents, it's our job to protect the health, safety, and well-being of our kids. It's the sacred duty of any President of this nation to do the same. The fact that the Trump administration is proposing deep cuts to the EPA--which is charged with keeping our air safe to breathe, our water safe to drink and our climate protected--is both reckless and negligent. When a President puts the profits of polluters ahead of the health and safety of American families, it's clear he's taking sides against our kids and their future. Trump preaches climate denial while Americans suffer from catastrophic extreme storms, and he undermines climate solutions our kids deserve, like 100% clean energy. Moms, dads and grandparents are standing strong against EPA cuts, and standing up for---with every fiber of our being--the right of our children to live in a democracy where political leaders will protect our children above all else."  

Since it’s launch, Moms Mobilize has garnered support from celebrities including Ashley Judd, Ellen Pompeo, Alfre Woodard, Angie Martinez; andAli Wong; CEOs like Bozoma Saint John, chief brand officer at Uber; advocates from Moms Clean Air Force, Climate Parents, Mothers Out Front; and thousands of moms around the country. Read their open letter here.

 

# # #

Green For All is a climate and economic justice organization working at the intersection of poverty and pollution to create an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty. Green For All is an initiative of The Dream Corps. Click to here learn more about Mom’s Mobilize.


Green For All, Moms, Reps. Barragán, Gabbard, Lee, Jackson-Lee and Jayapal Lead Day of Action for Climate Justice

Green For All, Moms Clean Air Force, Climate Parents, advocates deliver over 300,000 signatures to Members of Congress on Capitol Hill.

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BUSTLE: An Open Letter To The Women Of Congress, From Climate Change Activists, Actors, & Average Moms

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma and historic fires, federal agencies are struggling to keep up. Meanwhile, the Trump Administration is pursing a 31 percent budget cut to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In response, over 100 women and mothers from all walks of life have come together to sign an open letter asking Congress to get serious about protecting kids and communities from poison, ending harmful pollution, and preventing the next climate disaster by fully funding the EPA.

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GREENBIZ: Why Moms (and the rest of us) Must Fight for EPA's Future

By Vien Truong for greenbiz.com

In the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma, Americans have been compelled to face an indisputable fact: Climate change is real and it has set upon us. To continue oversimplifying it as strictly a matter of "global warming" is to deny the breadth and scope of its detrimental physical and economic impacts on the most vulnerable among us.

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GREEN FOR ALL: Moms Mobilize mini-documentary series [Trailer]

Green For All's CEO, Vien Truong shares why this fight against poverty and pollution is so personal. Hear from moms across the country -- as she travels to meet with women who are mobilizing for clear air, clean water, and a future for their kids. Then join us to take action and sign our petition:

SIGN OUR PETITION


Meet Jaden: The kid fighting climate change with a comic book

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Recently, Green For All traveled to New York to sit down with Jaden Anthony, the 11-year-old who was inspired to do something to help people in Flint and other parts of the country. Jaden introduced us to his project. Kid Brooklyn is a graphic novel series that follows Jaden & friends as they are given the power to save the planet from evil aliens (disguised as corporations) and environmental crises. 

Watch Jaden's Video

Read more

KQED Talks Climate Equity, Diversity in Tech with Vien Truong

AIRED AUGUST 25, 2017 on KQED NEWS.

 

 


Van Jones and Green For All Rally with CHISPA for Clean Buses for Nevada Students

August 23, 2017. Article published in NEVADA FORWARD. By Andrew Davey. 

“It is very hard to learn when you can not breathe.” That’s the message Green for All founder Van Jones had for Governor Brian Sandoval (R) last Saturday. He joined Chispa Nevada and over 100 grassroots community activists in Las Vegas to call on the State of Nevada to invest in cleaner school buses for Nevada students.

WHAT’S AT STAKE?

Volkswagen has agreed to pay a total of $19 billion to settle the criminal and civil cases involving its diesel emissions cheating scheme. Volkswagen claimed its vehicles were “clean diesel”, even though they were actually in violation of federal fuel economy standards.

Nevada will likely receive $24.8 million from the Volkswagen settlement over the next 10 years.

Read more

Making Sure Your Houston Relief Money Is Going to Black Folks Who Need It Most Isn't Easy

Reposted article published by The Root, contributor Charles D. Ellison.

People make their way out of a flooded Houston neighborhood Aug. 29, 2017, after it was inundated with rainwater following Hurricane Harvey. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)


Houston state Rep. Shawn Thierry’s majority-black district houses nearly 200,000 residents, the Houston Texans football stadium, and a massive population of folks who were already low-income and living from paycheck-to-paycheck.

They were all in the eye of the storm when Hurricane Harvey hit. 

“It’s really that bad,” Thierry, a single mom of a 4-year old, told The Root. “My house got hit, too; there’s mold everywhere. But I just really don’t have time to think about that; I’ve got to make sure my people are taken care of.”

But as millions upon millions of dollars roll in from a growing lineup of celebrities, athletes and a nation of sympathetic Americans eager to save #HoustonStrong, there’s no guarantee that much of that money will reach already economically battered Houstonians who need it most. 

 

 

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The climate movement’s new battle cry

By Bill McKibben for Nation of Change

The knock on environmentalists is that they’ve been better at opposing than proposing.

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Tour against hate makes stop in New Orleans

By James Sebastien for Louisiana Weekly

On August 17, New Orleans’ historic Saenger Theatre was visited by Van Jones’ WE RISE AGAINST HATE TOUR. The Crescent City was just one stop on this 14-city tour powered by Dream Corps’ Love Army (#LoveArmy) and in partnership with Roc Nation.

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Analysis | The Energy 202: Trump's lack of nuclear knowledge is what's really scary

By Dino Grandoni for The Washington Post

A year-and-a-half ago, Donald Trump was thrown a question about the U.S. nuclear arsenal that he still hasn't answered very satisfactorily.

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Can business leaders be culture healers?

Vien Truong, director of Green For All, is bringing equity, social justice and climate justice together to help build a prosperous and fair society.

This means healing the deepening divide between the "haves" and "have-nots" in the U.S. — and business leaders are in a position of responsibility to move the needle on these issues. The effective voice of businesses was evident when they joined forces to sign the "We're still in" pledge after the U.S. withdrew from the Paris Agreement on climate. 

"We need businesses to be leaders more than ever before with the people they hire, the culture that they set, even how they influence states and governments, " said Truong during VERGE Hawaii 17. "We need businesses to step up as citizens." 

Read more

More Boldly Going: A Family Foundation Turns to Activism in Trump Era

By Tate Williams for Inside Philanthropy

The giving of the Roddenberry Foundation to date has projected a kind of sunny progressivism, channeling creator Gene Roddenberry's and Star Trek’s optimism about human potential for innovation, equality, and inclusivity. 

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The power of community inclusion


Overcoming Our Toxic Legacy

This week, Green For All spoke with Heather Von St. James, an 11-year mesothelioma cancer survivor who has dedicated her life to fighting for a ban on asbestos. In 2006 her life was upended by an environmental toxin she was exposed to 30 years earlier. Now she has something to say to Trump, the families of Flint, and the country about pollution and the future we are fighting for.

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“What I want to say to the families in Flint is to not give up, to keep fighting. They want us to be silent, they want us to give up and just accept things, but we can’t and we won’t. We will continue to fight for what it right, what is moral. The truth will win in the end.” - Heather Von St. James 

Read more

3 barriers holding equitable cities back

By Lauren Hepler for GreenBiz

In the grand scheme of pressing issues facing residents of U.S. cities — scarce affordable housing, high health care costs, anxiety about immigration status or racial tension, to name a few — warnings about the long-term consequences of climate change can, understandably, take a back seat.

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Sierra Club (via Public) / Environmental Groups Urge Support for Affordable Care Act and Planned Parenthood

WASHINGTON, D.C.-- Ahead of next week's vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Alaska Wilderness League, Sierra Club, League of Conservation Voters, Natural Resources Defense Council, Green Latinos, Green For All, Safe Climate Campaign, Environmental Working Group, Endangered Species Coalition, Earthworks, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, Oil Change International, The Climate Reality Project, Clean Water Action, Climate Vote Hawks, and 350.org sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mcconnell, Senate Minority Leader Schumer, and House Speaker Ryan and House Minority Leader Pelosi urging support of the Affordable Care Act and Planned Parenthood. This letter follows a letter sent in March ahead of the House vote on the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

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Sierra Club (via Public) / Environmental Justice Organizations Request EJ Report for the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative Programs in Maryland

Annapolis, MD-- Green For All, Free Your Voice, GreenLatinos, Maryland Environmental Health Network, Chispa Maryland of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters, Dr. Sacoby Wilson and the Sierra Club delivered a letter to Maryland's Department of the Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles, Maryland Public Service Commission Chairman Kevin Hughes and Maryland Energy Administration Director Beth Tung today requesting an environmental justice (EJ) analysis of the pollution reduction and economic development impacts of the RGGI program.

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The unsustainable whiteness of green

By Nikhil Swaminathan for Grist

Aaron Mair’s story starts out all too familiar to people of color who have encountered any of the big green groups: He asked one for help dealing with an issue of critical importance to the health of his family and community — and was turned away.

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EPA Cuts Are Way Too Extreme

By Climate Nexus for EcoWatch

Both Democrats and Republicans in Congress said Thursday that the Trump administration's proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cuts are too harsh.

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VAN JONES ANNOUNCES NATIONWIDE WE RISE TOUR powered by #LoveArmy

Exclusive Intimate Talks Combine Changemakers and Tastemakers

ACTION, CONNECTION AND EDUCATION 

(New York, NY: June 12, 2017) Van Jones & Roc Nation are proud to announce a groundbreaking partnership and nationwide event tour: WE RISE Tour powered by #LoveArmy. WE RISE will bring an array of artists, athletes, thought leaders and local leaders to cities across the country this summer. Van Jones, a renowned activist, CNN commentator and two-time New York Times bestselling author will headline the tour promoted by Live Nation. 100% of net ticket proceeds will go to the Dream Corps initiatives and local charities.

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Podcast: Vien Truong — An Environmental Hero for Our Times

By Aimee Allison for Democracy in Color

 

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California Latinx Community Fights for their Future

By: Lauren Gaytan and Déjà Thomas

When planning commissions no longer listen to the citizens, citizens will make their voices heard. That is what community activists, like Raul Lopez, are doing in the fight for clean air and a healthy Oxnard, California in this video: Screen Shot 2017-06-07 at 1.19.15 PM.png

(Image credit Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy)

Oxnard, California is a small farm-working community of color in Southern California that has mobilized their community to voice their concerns for their assets and dreams for the future, in the face of a proposed power plant, the Puente Power Project.

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Fast Company: Green Jobs Are Still the Future of Work After Trump's Paris Accord Pullout

And the most innovative companies already know it.

Fast Company June 7, 2017

Excerpt:

While President Trump stood in the White House Rose Garden last Thursday to announce America’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord, I was in Brussels at a green jobs conference. It was a stark contrast. Even as Trump announced that the world’s second-largest polluter would no longer commit to curbing carbon emissions, a choice he wrongly framed as good for the U.S. economy, I talked with European leaders about the promise of advancing a green economy and ways to avoid disastrous environmental policies that could undermine it.

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Prince's secret energy investment could help solar startups under Trump

By Maria Gallucci for Mashable

The late, great Prince quietly funded solar energy startups before he died last year, and now that funding could help young clean-tech firms navigate the turbulent Trump era. 

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Black Lives Matter raises $1,300 for Flint

By Brian Blair for Columbus Republic

Black Lives Matter of Columbus’ fund drive to help people in Michigan get their water pipes fixed stands at $1,300, according to organizers. A total of $500 of that was raised during a Saturday rally and march in downtown Columbus at City Hall and The Commons.

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Politicians and Environmentalists React After Trump Pulls US From Paris Agreement

By Yessenia Funes for Colorlines RSS Feed

The president says he's open to negotiating the terms of the agreement, though world leaders assert it can not be renegotiated.

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Paris Climate Accord: The Future Depends on Us

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Green For All’s director, Vien Truong, is participating in the European Commission’s Green Week in Brussels, where she is meeting with top European leaders to discuss the promise of advancing a green economy and the importance of avoiding Trump’s disastrous environmental policies.

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Green For All Statement on U.S.’ Potential Withdrawal From Paris Agreement

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Contact: Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com 

Green For All Statement on U.S.’ Potential Withdrawal From Paris Agreement

OAKLAND, Calif.--Recent reports suggest that Donald Trump intends to back out of the Paris Climate agreement. This could reverse years of climate progress globally.

This week, Green For All’s director, Vien Truong, is participating in the European Commission’s Green Week in Brussels, where she is discussing the promise of advancing a green economy and the importance of avoiding Trump’s disastrous environmental policies with top European leaders.

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Black Lives Matter hoping to help with water problems

By Brian Blair for Republic Online

Black Lives Matter of Columbus will join with other groups at a rally and march at 2 p.m. Saturday to raise its voice and money to help people in Flint, Michigan, get their tainted water problems resolved. 

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Scientists Really Aren’t the Best Champions of Climate Science

Facts and data alone won’t inspire people to take action in the fight against global warming. So what will?

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Flint Residents Still Suffering, Exposed to Contaminated Water

By D. Kevin McNeir for Voice & Viewpoint

Residents of Flint, Michigan have very little to celebrate, three years after the water crisis in the city made national headlines.

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Green For All Statement On Trump’s Dirty Budget

For Immediate Release: Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Contact: Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com

Green For All Statement On Trump’s Dirty Budget

OAKLAND, CA--Following the release of Trump’s budget launching an unprecedented attack on our children’s health, access to clean air and safe green spaces for families to play, work and grow, Green For All Director Vien Truong released the following statement: 

“In one budget, Donald Trump has managed to achieve what most polluter’s have strived for over the last 40 years -- the complete decimation of the Environmental Protection Agency. Green For All joins millions of Americans in calling on Congress to reject Trump’s dirty budget.

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VIDEO: The California Model: Make Polluters Pay

Reposted from UniversityOfCalifornia.edu

Even when climate change is a top priority for lawmakers, progress is challenging. It often comes down to money: We have plenty of expensive problems right now, so expensive problems down the road take a backseat.

It’s becoming increasingly clear, however, that climate change isn’t down the road, it’s right now — and addressing it can help solve other problems.

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True Climate Justice Puts Communities of Color First

By Audrea Lim for The Nation

Black and brown communities have long borne the brunt of our addiction to fossil fuels—and now they are leading the fight for a post-carbon economy.

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As Machines Take Jobs, Companies Need to Get Creative About Making New Ones

By Harvard Business Review

Jobs in retail, transportation, manufacturing, and agriculture are highly vulnerable to technological change. 

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The Resistance is Growing: Dispatches from Flint to Washington, DC

People all over the United States are fed up with attacks on our air, our water, and our future. At Green For All we are building a future to fight for every.single.day. Let me shed some light on our actions since our founder, Van Jones launched #FixThePipes for Flint on April 20th.

Why Flint now? Just look. A young mom in Flint took this video from her bathroom on April 15th:

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Big Sean Joins Fight to Help Flint Water Crisis

By Lenore T. Adkins for Afro

Rapper Big Sean has joined a celebrity lineup helping to raise money for residents of Flint, Mich. still grappling with poisoned water.

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Van Jones Names Roc Nation As Exclusive Management

By Roc Nation 

NEW YORKMay 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Renowned activist, CNN commentator and two-time New York Timesbestselling author, Van Jones, has joined Roc Nation as an exclusive management client.

Roc Nation will work with Van across all aspects of his career. The work will be about making change. It will be cause-oriented, it will be justice-oriented, and it will strive to uplift all people in innovative ways.

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NowThis: Here's why the Peoples Climate March is so important

Van Jones And Vien Truong of Green For All Discuss Why They March
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Fast Company: The Flint Water Crisis Is Far From Over: They Still Need New Pipes

Fast Company April 27, 2017

Excerpt:

Green For All wants to deliver $500,000 directly to Flint families and raise awareness of environmental injustice across the United States.

Three years ago, the city of Flint, Michigan, in search of a cheaper water supply, connected its system to the nearby Flint River. The switch was meant to be temporary; as such, officials neglected to treat the water flowing into the pipes to ensure it wouldn’t cause corrosion. Almost immediately, residents, 40% of whom live in poverty, took note of the strange taste and color of the water, but their complaints fell on deaf ears. By the time officials acknowledged that the water from the Flint River had corroded the pipes, high levels of lead had already seeped into the water supply of 100,000 people.

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Three Years Later, Water Specialist Says Broken Pipes, Not Lack of Water Treatment, Was Real Cause of the Flint Crisis

Although it’s been three years, the struggle for Flint, Mich., is far from over as the lead-tainted city is still in need of new water pipes.

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WaPo: Laying a road map for states, liberal senators introduce bill to end U.S. fossil fuel use by 2050

Washington Post April 27, 2017

Excerpt:

Sens. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) introduced legislation Thursday that calls on the U.S. to transition off fossil fuels by 2050, hoping to spur action on the state and local level, even as the Trump administration pushes for expanded coal, oil and natural gas production.

The 100×50 Act would impose new federal mandates requiring vehicles in the United States to release zero carbon emissions, while barring federal approval of oil and gas pipelines in the country, while also establishing an auction of “climate bonds” that would raise money to support renewable energy projects. The measure would also provide job training for low-income Americans and Americans of color, as well as those in coal communities, to work in the renewable energy sector.

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Merkley, Sanders goal: U.S. on all renewables by 2050

From KTVZ

WASHINGTON - Senators Jeff Merkley (D-OR) and Bernie Sanders (I-VT), along with Senators Edward J. Markey (D-MA) and Cory Booker (D-NJ), introduced landmark climate legislation Thursday that would transition the United States to 100 percent clean and renewable energy by no later than 2050.

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Laying a road map for states, liberal senators introduce bill to end U.S. fossil fuel use by 2050

By Juliet Eilperin for Washington Post

Sens. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) introduced legislation Thursday that calls on the U.S. to transition off fossil fuels by 2050, hoping to spur action on the state and local level, even as the Trump administration pushes for expanded coal, oil and natural gas production.

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The Flint Water Crisis Is Far From Over: They Still Need New Pipes

By Ellie Anzilotti for Fast Company

Green For All wants to deliver $500,000 directly to Flint families and raise awareness of environmental injustice across the United States.

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3 State Reps Announce Congressional Caucus Dedicated to Environmental and Climate Justice

By Yessenia Fuentes for Colorlines

The task force aims to provide marginalized groups with a voice.

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Common Joins Van Jones and ‘Green For All’ to #FixThePipes in Flint

It’s the three year anniversary of the poisonous pipes installation in Flint, Michigan and despite popular belief, the issue has not yet been completely resolved. Although the city of Flint reached a settlement with the State of Michigan, the plan does not provide all Flint families with clean water immediately. They are still waiting.

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Frontline Communities Seeking Solutions Unite for Peoples Climate March

By Keith Rushing for Huffington Post

Environmental justice groups will descend on Washington, D.C., this weekend from around the country to ramp up their fight against climate change. They will come together on April 29th for the Peoples Climate Movement march, walking from the U.S. Capitol to the White House and finally to the Washington Monument.

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Groups Gear Up For Major Climate March

President Trump and people concerned about climate change will observe the president's 100th day in office.  But not in the same way. 

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With Our Health and Billions at Stake, Black People Need to Join the Clean-Energy Revolution Now

By D. Amari Jackson on Atlanta Black Star. 

Despite the Trump administration’s disdain for renewable energies and promotion of fossil fuels like coal, the current revolution in clean energy is showing no signs of slowing down. The Solar Foundation recently reported the number of solar jobs increased by an unprecedented 25 percent from 2015 to 2016 to produce a total of 260,077 workers nationwide. 

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I Believe That We Will Win - Actions from Earth Day to May Day

We are in a fight for our future. This Saturday begins an historic Earth Week of Action to defend people on the frontlines of pollution -- from coal miners to Flint families -- and our Mother Earth which we depend on for life.

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Invest in Oregon by capping carbon (Opinion)

Posted in Oregon Live April 18, 2017

Maggie Tallmadge and Vien Truong

Oregon's state leaders are debating the very significant environmental policy of whether to cap the climate pollution coming from our biggest polluters. This decision is important for Oregonians and for the country as a whole. Why? Because this policy can clean up the air and generate proceeds to lift up communities facing poverty and pollution. On top of that, this can be a counterbalance to environmental rollbacks by the federal government.

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These Mothers Are Fighting Climate Change for Their Children

Reposted from Peoples Climate Movement on Medium

The Peoples Climate March is a march for climate, jobs and justice. It’s about intersectional movement building, intergenerational struggle, and the right to clean water, breathable air, and economic opportunity. These mothers demonstrate not only the breadth of our collective, but the wisdom of our cause. We all have much to learn from why they march.

Vien Truong, Green For All (Oakland, CA)

What does the Peoples Climate Movement mean to you?

The Peoples Climate Movement is a chance for people from all backgrounds to stand with communities living at the frontlines of some of the worst pollution in America for solutions that uplift the health, wealth, and security of everybody by leaving polluters no place to dump their waste.

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Green For All, State Innovation Exchange Launch Campaign To Revolutionize State Climate Policy

For Immediate Release: March 30, 2017

Contact: Nina Smith, nina@megaphonestrategies.com, 301-717-9006

               Margaret Ann Morgan, margaretann@stateinnovation.org, 601-551-1808

Green For All, State Innovation Exchange Launch Campaign To Revolutionize State Climate Policy

Groups Team Up to Push State Climate Policy that Prioritizes Communities of Color and Low-Income Communities Harmed First and Worst by Fossil Fuels

Oakland, Ca. -- Following Trump’s announcement this week that his administration plans to dismantle the Clean Power Plan, Green For All -- a non-profit co-founded by Van Jones and led by policy architect and innovator Vien Truong -- launched a campaign with the State Innovation Exchange (SiX) urging state legislators to advance state climate policy and pledge to prioritize funds to invest in communities of color and low-income communities that have been harmed first and worst by fossil fuels.

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The secret behind creating the largest fund in U.S. history for building a green economy

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By Vien Truong 

[Reposted courtesy of State Innovation Exchange]

As the head of Green For All, I travel the country working with grassroots leaders and state electeds to craft policies that prioritize families and workers living in the most polluted cities in America.

My heart breaks every time I hear about another Flint or Standing Rock. I know what it’s like to live in a struggling and polluted community. In Oakland, California where I raise my 3-year old twin boys, air pollution is so bad that where we live is known as the “toxic triangle.” I see dilapidated homes, a food desert, homeless families and neglected schools on my way to work every day. It is because I see and live in the daily reality of what poverty and pollution looks like that I have continued to feel the urgency to fight for communities like mine all across the country. Will you join me?

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Statement on Trump Executive Order to Roll Back Clean Power Plan

For Immediate Release: Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922, diane@megaphonestrategies.com

Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com

Statement on Trump Executive Order to Roll Back Clean Power Plan

OAKLAND, Calif.--Today, Green For All Director Vien Truong released the following statement in response to reports that Donald Trump signed an executive order rolling back key parts of the Clean Power Plan:

“Today, we have taken a step back as a country. This administration continues to gut key protections that keep our families safe and our waters clean.

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Trump’s Executive Order Repeals Environmental Protections; Hurts People He Claims He Wants to Help

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 28, 2017

Repost from PeoplesClimate.org.

Contact: Sharon Singh, sharon.singh@peoplesclimate.org ; 202.499.9565; @spksingh


March for Climate, Justice and Jobs on April 29 to Resist Attacks and Bring Solutions to Elected Leaders

Washington, DC — In response to Trump administration’s latest executive order that begins to repeal the Clean Power Plan (CPP) and environmental protections, the Peoples Climate Movement (PCM) is demonstrating itself as a massive and wide-reaching movement in opposition to this dangerous step that puts people and the planet at grave risk. The PCM is a broad-based ground-breaking coalition of hundreds of faith-based, labor unions, indigenous, civil rights and environmental justice groups based around the country working together to build bold solutions that tackle climate change, rooted in economic and racial justice.

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America Didn't Vote to Change Clean Air Act to the Dirty Air Act

Watch Green For All Director of Partnerships, Kim Noble discuss the heroin epidemic, the drug war, and Trump's attacks on clean air and clean water on Thom Hartmann. kimhartmann.jpg


Frontline Communities Rally at EPA Headquarters In Washington to Defend Climate Progress

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922, diane@megaphonestrategies.com

Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com

Frontline Communities Rally at EPA Headquarters In Washington to Defend Climate Progress   

Responding to executive orders undermining climate protections, and proposed EPA budget cuts, leaders from frontline communities gathered to defend climate progress

 

WASHINGTON, DC--Today, Green For All and its labor and community partners organized an emergency lunchtime rally at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) headquarters in opposition to Trump’s disastrous, anti-climate agenda that rolls back climate protection rules and guts clean air and water protections. Joined by Reps. Keith Ellison (D-Minn), Jared Polis (D-Co), and Sheila Jackson-Lee (D-Texas), the protest also highlighted reports of proposed catastrophic budget cuts to the EPA and pushed back against attacks on EPA employees and the programmatic and scientific integrity of the work they do.

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Carbon pollution isn’t free: How Oregon can cap, trade, reinvest

Michelle Romero
Photos by Arkady Brown
Michelle Romero, deputy director of Green For All, speaks to Street Roots before testifying to the Oregon Legislature in support of a measure that would invest carbon market revenue in economically depressed communities. Lawmakers in Salem are considering five different bills with the same goal of significantly reducing Oregon’s greenhouse gas emissions. 

Why I Reject Trump’s “Dirty Water Order”

Last Tuesday, Trump signed an executive order gutting protections for wetlands and drinking water sources for more than 117 million Americans. But what really caught my attention was that on the same day, he signed another order to supposedly strengthen White House partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). I saw this as Trump being Trump -- pretending he wants to help African American communities on the one hand, while with the stroke of his pen, doing some real damage on the other.

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Progressive Leaders Issue Joint Statement on Fighting President Trump and Conservatives’ Corporate, Billionaire-Driven Agenda

For Immediate Release: Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Contact: Margaret Ann Morgan, (601) 551-1808, margaretann@sixaction.org

Progressive Leaders Issue Joint Statement on Fighting President Trump and Conservatives’ Corporate, Billionaire-Driven Agenda

State legislators and allied groups will counter Trump’s address to Congress with #FightingForFamilies Week of Action 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, SiX Action joined several national policy and advocacy groups in releasing the following statement ahead of President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress:

“In a matter of hours, President Trump will be delivering his address to Congress and laying out his vision for the country. We know that when it comes to the Trump administration, actions speak louder than words, so regardless of what we hear tonight, here is what we can expect over the coming weeks and months: more giveaways to corporate CEOs and the wealthiest 1%, more rollbacks of critical worker protections, and a repackaging of the same failed policies that depress wages and offer no actual path to the middle class for America’s working families. 

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African American Leaders Reject Trump’s “Dirty Water Order”

For Immediate Release: Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922, diane@megaphonestrategies.com

             Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com 

African American Leaders Reject Trump’s “Dirty Water Order”

OAKLAND, Calif. -- Today, as Trump signed an executive order gutting protections for wetlands and drinking water sources for more than 117 million Americans, he signed another attempting to strengthen White House partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. African American leaders in the climate justice movement denounced his efforts to appeal to Black Americans while signing away their rights to clean water.

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A New Home for Green The Church

We want to share some exciting news: Green The Church has a new home! Green The Church is a national effort designed to tap into the power and purpose of the African  American faith community, to explore and expand the role of churches as centers for environmental and economic resilience.  The vision for Green The Church was birthed out of the Black Church experience by Rev. Ambrose Carroll.  A few years ago, Rev. Carroll, who was a Green For All Fellow, asked Green For All to help incubate the campaign, providing a temporary home where the vision could be cultivated and grow.

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Green For All: Pruitt’s Confirmation Ushers in Dark Era for America’s Health

For Immediate Release: Friday, February 17, 2017

Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922, diane@megaphonestrategies.com

Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com

 

Green For All: Pruitt’s Confirmation Ushers in Dark Era for America’s Health

OAKLAND, Calif. -- Today, Green For All Director Vien Truong released the following statement in response to news that the Senate confirmed Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency:

“Scott Pruitt’s confirmation by the U.S. Senate is a huge setback for low income communities and communities of color, who have a right to clean water and air that doesn’t make our kids sick. Pruitt’s confirmation is a tragic outcome for all Americans, but especially for frontline communities who have been subjected to the the nation’s most hazardous industrial pollution. His confirmation begins a dark new era for America's health that could take us back to the days of burning rivers.

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Marching for frontline families and spreading a message of love

As the nation was preparing to swear in the 45th president, I along with my colleagues were turning our attention towards the day after – the Women’s March on Washington. We spent the weeks leading up to the March inviting others to join our contingent to stand with the many women and families at the frontlines of the fight for equal rights and to say that we must fight different on climate change. We must put workers and families at the frontlines of pollution first. My organization Green For All put out a press statement in conjunction with the Women’s March. Several partners (Climate Parents, Emerald Cities Collaborative, Flint Rising, Green the Church, GreenLatinos, Interfaith Power & Light, Moms Clean Air Force, NextGen Climate, and the Power Shift Network) signed on to say they will put frontline families first over polluter profits. We also were marching to spread the message of the #LoveArmy in contrast to Trump’s message of hate – when it gets harder to love, love harder. 

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Green For All Decries Decision to Advance DAPL

For Immediate Release: February 8, 2017

Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922 diane@megaphonestrategies.com

 

Green For All Decries Decision to Advance DAPL

SAN FRANCISCO -- Green For All Director Vien Truong released the following statement in response to news that the Trump Administration has waived the environmental impact assessment, paving the way for the final step to construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline:

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Green for All Slams Trump’s Reckless DAPL & KXL Executive Orders

San Francisco, CA - Green For All Director Vien Truong released the following statement in response to news that President Trump has signed executive orders advancing construction on the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines:

“Donald Trump’s executive orders are evidence that his administration sees people living at the frontlines of pollution and environmental devastation as unimportant.

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Green For All, Environmental Groups Join Women’s March to “Fight Climate Different” in the Age of Trump

For Immediate Release

Contact: Nina Smith, nina@megaphonestrategies.com, 301-717-9006 cell

 

Green For All, Environmental Groups Join Women’s March to “Fight Climate Different” in the Age of Trump

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. --  In advance of the Women’s March on Washington, Green For All -- with Clean Air Prince George’s, Climate Parents, Emerald Cities Collaborative, Flint Rising, Green the Church, GreenLatinos, Interfaith Power & Light, Moms Clean Air Force, NextGen Climate, and the Power Shift Network -- are pledging to denounce attacks on the environment by prioritizing vulnerable communities living on the frontlines of poverty and pollution.

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Green For All Statement on Scott Pruitt's EPA Nomination

For Immediate Release: December 7, 2016
Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922, diane@megaphonestrategies.com
Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com

Green For All Statement on Scott Pruitt’s EPA Nomination

Green For All Deputy Director Michelle Romero released the following statement in response to news that President-elect Trump nominated Scott Pruitt to head the EPA:

“The importance of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s role in ensuring that the rights of all communities to clean air and safe drinking water are protected, cannot be understated. The nomination of Scott Pruitt for EPA Administrator -- someone who has consistently challenged EPA’s efforts to regulate toxins and keep families safe, while favoring fracking and big polluters -- is deeply disappointing.”

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Green For All Applauds Key Climate Legislation in Illinois

For Immediate Release: December 7, 2016
Contact: Diane May, (317) 292-2922, diane@megaphonestrategies.com
Nina Smith, 301-717-9006, nina@megaphonestrategies.com

Green for All Applauds Key Climate Legislation in Illinois

Green For All Deputy Director Michelle Romero released the following statement in response to the signing of critical clean energy legislation by Illinois Governor Rauner:

We applaud Governor Rauner and state leaders in Illinois for enacting the Future Energy Jobs bill, which will expand the state’s usage of renewable energy to 25 percent. This bill is a critical step in setting Illinois on a path towards achieving a clean energy future for all by prioritizing investments in the communities who need it most. The Future Energy Jobs bill dedicates millions of dollars in state funds into expanding clean energy in Illinois and bringing good jobs to low-income communities most harmed by pollution.

 

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Green For All Calls for Stronger Pollution Cuts from Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative

For Immediate Release: November 21, 2016

Contact: Michele Setteducato, 732-614-3818, michele.setteducato@gmail.com

Green For All Calls for Stronger Pollution Cuts from Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative

Today, the Northeast states involved in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative presented a scenario to cut greenhouse gases by either 2.5 percent or 3.5 percent annually starting in 2020.

Vien Truong, Director of Green For All released the following statement in response:

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Green For All Remarks on the Defeat of Washington’s Initiative 732

For Immediate Release: November 8, 2016

Contact: Michele Setteducato, 732-614-3818michele.setteducato@gmail.com
 
Green For All Remarks on the Defeat of Washington’s Initiative 732
 
Tonight, the people of Washington state voted down Initiative 732, the “revenue-neutral” carbon tax proposal on the ballot.

In response Vien Truong, Director of Green For All released the following statement:

“We must combat climate change by transitioning from fossil fuels to clean energy. As we do so, it is pivotal to invest in a just transition. Initiative 732 rightfully aimed to put a price on carbon, but unjustly favored tax cuts for corporations over investments in clean energy and green job creation for struggling families and displaced workers. This defeat shows that Washingtonians recognized that I-732 is a false solution."
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Recap from the 2016 Green The Church Summit in Baltimore

Carroll Ministries, Interfaith Power & Light, U.S. Green Building Council, and Green For All engaged church leaders and congregations at Green The Church Summit

On October 25, 2016, one hundred African American faith leaders from around the country joined together for the third annual Green The Church Summit. The summit explored and expanded the role of churches as centers for environmental and economic resilience. The faith leaders at the Summit have helped black and brown communities that are often the most impacted by pollution from fossil fuel and waste facilities fight for clean water and air, as well as increasing health, wealth, and opportunity.

View photos from the Summit.

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Green For All Responds to Ratification of the Paris Climate Agreement

For Immediate Release: October 5, 2016

Green For All Responds to Ratification of the Paris Climate Agreement

Today, President Obama announced a historic moment in the fight against climate change.  The world has crossed the threshold needed to bring the Paris Agreement into force on November 4th.

In response Vien Truong, Director of Green For All released the following statement:

“The ratification of the Paris Climate Agreement today is a historic step forward to fight climate change not only in the United States but around the world.”

“Communities of color are hit first and worst by the pollution from the fossil fuel industry around our country.  We must protect the health and safety of the millions of people on those frontlines as we implement this agreement worldwide. If we are to meet the Climate Agreement goals, we must invest deeply in the frontlines and ensure that all communities are protected from climate change devastation.”

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Farmland and the Concrete Jungle

Growing up outside of the Atlanta city limits, surrounded by Georgia red clay and acres of green space, I was innocently oblivious to the effects of air pollution in my world. Summer vacations, however, were spent inside the city limits - East Point, GA to be exact. My aunt and uncle would have my brother and I excitedly pack our suitcases for a two-week 'staycation' in the city that was “too busy to hate.” As my uncle’s blue Volvo drove past miles of green pastures and eventually swiveled its way through the busy I-75 highway exchange, I observed the change in the “color of the air” and I noticed my hesitancy to now take the big, engulfing breaths that I enjoyed in my small town, on the humid summer nights filled with the sweet smell of honeysuckles and the intoxicating glow of lightning bugs.

In hindsight, I wonder if my trajectory would have been different had I grown up in an area that lacked access to one of the most fundamental rights seemingly guaranteed to all: clean air. Would I have grown up in an area exposed to harmful pollutants like sulfur dioxide and mercury? Would I have suffered from asthma and often been susceptible to life-threatening illnesses like cancer? Would my home have been more vulnerable to climate change-induced storms and floods? Would my neighborhood have had to bear the disproportionate brunt of the burden of decisions made by those who did not represent nor live in my neighborhood?

What are the costs when we do not account for the deadly effects of pollution in areas that disadvantaged populations call home? Often the risks and consequences are overlooked, leaving low-income, marginalized, indigenous people, and communities of color with a collective experience of disease and mistrust of those in charge of ensuring and creating equity in access to clean air.  These communities are now beginning to break ground and find a voice in repairing the damage created by dirty energy systems.

The EPA’s Clean Power Plan (CPP) presents an opportunity for voices in “frontline” communities to be heard.  Through the CPP, states are called to engage in conversations and concrete action surrounding the impact of carbon pollution as described by those most affected in the process. Directed implementation of funding acquired from polluters can restore the power and pride back into the hands of the residents who have suffered the effects of pollution. However, for the CPP to translate into positive empowerment and investment in the aforementioned frontline communities, citizens and elected officials must engage proactively with a focus on social equity.

While we all currently experience the effects of air pollution in varying degrees, it is important to note that frontline communities experience pollution in an extremely different manner. Communities of color routinely fail to meet EPA standards for air quality, often attributed to their close proximity to power and coal plants. Comparatively, children in these areas experience excessive visits to the emergency room with asthma attacks, with African American children dying at alarming rates as a result of these attacks. With insufficient resources and less job security, recovering from personal health disasters becomes nearly impossible. The damage done in these neighborhoods should influence and continue to drive the decisions associated with the funding recovered from polluter fines.

With an equitable implementation plan, CPP can serve as a catalyst to addressing these issues by empowering neighborhoods with the necessary knowledge and foundation to begin creating an alternative narrative and a shift in resources.

For more information about an equitable implementation of the Clean Power Plan, visit www.TheCleanPowerPlan.com

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Alexis Carter is a southern historian and a middle school social studies teacher in Georgia. She enjoys reading, researching, and rewriting the narrative.


Green For All Responds to House Voting to Support Flint Water Crisis

For Immediate Release: September 28, 2016

Contact: Michele Setteducato, michele.setteducato@gmail.com

 

Green For All Responds to House Voting to Support Flint Water Crisis

Averting a near shutdown of the federal government, the U.S. House finally reached consensus today on supporting Flint in their ongoing water and financial crisis -- resulting in a vote passing a multi-million dollar support package.

In response Vien Truong, Director of Green For All released the following statement:

“Today is an important step forward for Flint -- and more needs to be done.”

“It has been more than two years since Flint’s water was poisoned as the result of Gov. Rick Snyder’s reckless actions. We have left Flint residents to struggle alone through the horrors of lead poisoning and government neglect. Housing prices have plummeted to next to nothing, people are still bathing their children in bottled water, and tens of thousands of people have lost generations of wealth. On top of that, many families will be dealing with the health ramifications of lead poisoning on their children for decades to come.”

“When I was in Flint, I met with residents who were poisoned from the lead water, who were afraid to shower or bathe their children -- who were on disability from being poisoned, and still working to support their kids and organize their community to rebuild.”

“For too long, those in low income communities and communities of color have been hurt first and worst by unhealthy water and air. Today is a step in the right direction, but far more needs to be done in the weeks and months ahead to do right with the people of Flint.”

In March, Green For All organized a tour of Flint with Van Jones, Tom Steyer, and Mark Ruffalo with local residents. Read more about that here: http://www.greenforall.org/mark_ruffalo_joins_green_for_all

 

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White House honors Oakland mom for work on climate change

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East Bay mom up for White House honor for work on climate change

Updated 5:35 pm, Thursday, July 14, 2016

An East Bay woman is one of 10 people from across the country who will be recognized by the White House Friday for helping low-income and underserved communities prepare for and adapt to a changing climate.

Vien Truong of Oakland will be named a White House Champion of Change for Climate Equity for her work to end environmental racism and empower communities of color to join in the fight against climate change.

“Winning this award is a huge honor,” Truong said. “I do a lot of this work by keeping my nose to the ground and trying to do the right thing. It feels very validating that we are being recognized by the president as doing the right thing.”

Truong was drawn to her current line of work after moving to the United States from war-torn Vietnam with her family, only to have her parents end up working as strawberry pickers in pesticide-ridden fields in Oregon, then at sweatshops in one of Oakland’s poorest and most polluted communities — where Truong ultimately grew up as the youngest of 11 siblings.

“It’s not right for families to struggle as much as they do and still not have a decent living condition,” Truong said. “I wanted to commit my life to make a better future for people.”

Truong is the director of Green for All, an Oakland nonprofit organization dedicated to creating an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty.

She lives in the city and has twin 3-year-old sons.

Truong may be known best for past efforts of expediting California’s transition to electric vehicles through the Charge Ahead Initiative and developing strong environmental-technology workforce standards through the California Climate Credit. She also has developed more than a dozen state policies, created energy and workforce programs, and advised public investments for energy and community development programs.

One of Truong’s most notable accomplishments was contributing to the passing of SB535, which in addition to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, redirected money paid by polluters to disadvantaged communities. In the past two years, that fund has directed more than $900 million to the poorest and most polluted communities in California, according to Green for All.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to honor individuals doing work to empower and inspire members of their communities.

White House officials selected award winners based on their work with low-income people in underserved communities.

Truong will be honored with nine others at the White House Friday, in a program that will feature remarks by Christy Goldfuss, managing director of the Council on Environmental Quality, and John Holdren, policy director for the White House Office of Science and Technology.

The event will be live-streamed on the White House website Friday at 11:30 a.m.

“It will be great,” Truong said. “We get to go to the White House. It’s been a dream of my mom’s for her entire life. I’m taking her and also bringing my niece to connect generations and show her what’s possible when you do great work.”

Read the San Francisco Chronicle article here.


White House Awards Vien Truong “Champion of Change for Climate Equity” Award

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

CONTACT: Daniel Wein | daniel@greenforall.org

 

 

White House Awards Vien Truong “Champion of Change for Climate Equity” Award

Green For All Director honored by White House for her work to combat pollution and poverty

 

On Friday July 15th, Vien Truong will be honored with the White House Champions of Change for Climate Equity Award for her work to end environmental racism and empower communities of color to join the fight against climate change. Truong is the Director of Green For All, a non-profit organization dedicated to creating an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty.

Truong grew up the youngest of 11 kids to a refugee family that fled from war torn Vietnam. Her parents worked in the pesticide ridden fields of Oregon picking strawberries. Later they worked at sweatshops, where she grew up in the heavily polluted region of Oakland, California, known as the “toxic triangle.” It is through these life experiences that Truong grew to understand the inequality and marginalization endured by disadvantaged communities.

“Winning this award is a great honor, and validates all the work we are doing to end environmental racism and prioritize solutions in frontline communities that are hit first and worst by pollution and climate change,” said Truong.

One of her landmark accomplishments is the passing of Senate Bill 535, a community reinvestment bill in California that created a polluters pay fund, which created the largest fund in history for low income communities to green up and to create economic revitalization for residents. In the last two years, it has directed over $900 million into the poorest and most polluted communities in California.

“I’m privileged to be leading Green For All to create national programs that will prioritize low income communities and communities of color in the crafting of policy across the country,” said Truong.

The award comes as Truong continues to lead in climate equity efforts in collaboration with a coalition called the Clean Power for All Collaborative, which is mobilizing to make sure that the EPA’s first national initiative to regulate greenhouse gases is used as an opportunity to clean up and reinvest in polluted communities.


Earthjustice: Green The Church, On A Mission of Faith For Sustainability

Photo courtesy Green for All

Rev. Ambrose Carroll, co-founder Green for All’s Green the Church movement, standing at the pulpit. The Green the Church movement is teaming up with spiritual leaders to engage churches and other houses of worship in the climate fight.

African American churches have been on the frontlines of the most important social movements of the last century. The movements begin at the pulpit, with preachers stirring their congregation to action via Sunday sermons that link spirituality and faith to a greater calling.

“The bible has a call for stewardship and a call to action—there’s a hook around sustainability,” says Julian McQueen, Green for All’s director of education and outreach.

Green for All’s Green the Church is commonly referred to as a movement, with founders McQueen and Rev. Ambrose Carroll saying it is bigger than just a program – it is a force on climate action.

“I come from a very social justice church atmosphere,” Carroll says. “For us, climate change is the civil rights issue of our day.”

When McQueen joined Green for All in 2008 on the organization’s 28th day of existence, he felt a calling to engage local community leaders and youth in protecting the environment. Now, serving as Green for All’s director of education and outreach, he has found success by creating Green for All’s All Fellowship program, which helps fellows develop skills to build community-generated solutions and organize in their cities. He’s also spearheaded the organization’s College Ambassadors Program, which supports the leadership development of students at historically black colleges and universities.

It was at Green for All some years later that he teamed up with Rev. Carroll, formerly a fellow, to pinpoint how they could move the African American church to engage in the climate fight.

In November 2014, the early stages of what is now known as Green the Church was born to grow sustainability programs and practices across the United States. To goal was to create a massive coalition of 1,000 faith partners across the country to share the need for conservation and preservation while seeking climate justice for disproportionately impacted communities.

“As we went to friends, brothers and sisters in the clergy and in the congregations, they wanted to show that this global issue was our issue,” says McQueen.

Carroll, a native of Oakland, California, is passionate about serving inner city communities and had been looking for a way to draw from his faith to spotlight global warming’s effects. He is working to engage with communities around how to reduce their carbon footprint and activate other tools to prevent environmental damage.  

Green the Church is close to having 400 churches in 28 states represented as of June 2016. It’s focusing its efforts on states engaged in work around both the Clean Power Plan, which sets a national limit on carbon pollution produced from power plants, and the “Polluters Pay Fund,” a campaign push by Green for All to make polluters pay to clean up their own toxic messes.

Gaining momentum to grow the houses of worship involved in the climate movement is not easy, but it is having a domino effect.

“It was so powerful,” says McQueen. “The call went out by word of mouth and made its way through the networks of churches and the response has been real.”

The national Green the Church program is a partnership between the grassroots organization’s parent, Green for All, in addition to churches and the U.S. Green Building Council. While not all churches and congregation properties have the resources to be LEED-certified, the council is sharing strategies on how to make places of worship, church centers and related facilities more sustainable.

Heading into its second year this fall, Green the Church is ramping up its engagement efforts so that churches have partners and allies within the state to support each other. The support and dissemination of information is all encompassing, with guidance and educational tools on how communities can take action on environmental issues.

“This is about building power,” Carroll says. “Our communities have bared the brunt of climate change and pollution enough. We want to see more churches green their facilities and share the word of sustainability. Decrease carbon emissions, raise green economy opportunities and flex the power of the African American church.”

In August 2015, Green the Church hosted its first three-day summit in Chicago at Trinity United Church of Christ, which is also President Obama’s home church. This summer, Green the Church is hosting faith-based trainings with clergy and leadership across the country. Among the topics is a candid discussion of how communities of color can best align and develop strategies to influence environmental solutions.

The group will descend upon the Baltimore, Maryland, region October 25 to 27 to host a summit with an expected 1,000 church leaders. The primary target for training has been church leadership—starting with pastor level leadership to reach the congregation from the top down.

“We want to make a real splash in the political fights by leading with moral calls to action to make polluters pay and invest in the communities most impacted by climate change,” says Carroll. “That’s my biggest hope—a push toward systemic change.”

In addition to being active in the Green the Church movement, Carroll is pushing back on a proposed coal terminal in Oakland. Carroll believes there is a need for organizations of all sizes from grassroots to grasstops (for example, large NGOs) to work together and go beyond the labels of environmentalist, conservationist and others to define their commitment to saving the planet.

“Are people thinking they’re environmentalists? No, they’re thinking of protecting their kids from a toxic site,” Carroll says. “We try to categorize and get everything to fit in these finite places, but it’s our job to talk about climate change and connect the dots to social justice.”

Both McQueen and Carroll are thought partners, armed with faith and passion for service to their communities with the hope of continuing to bridge a gap between the faith and environmental communities who want to create change.

They and the thousands they have signed on to the journey are guided by a moral imperative to protect the earth, but they do not define their relationship with the earth in the same ways as others.

“There’s a biblical text that talks about Elijah, and at one point in his ministry he was by himself. Elijah says, ‘It’s I and I alone and no one else is left.’ And God says, ‘You are not alone.’”

“That’s how we feel about doing this work,” says Carroll. “It’s about bringing people out of isolation.”

Read the full story here.


Democratic Platform Drafting Hearing: Vien Truong Remarks

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Vien Truong gave remarks and answered questions on June 17th at the Democratic Platform Drafting Hearing of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Phoenix. 


Medium: This Mother’s Day, Let’s Celebrate Moms Fighting Injustice

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Afeni Shakur, the civil rights activist and former Black Panther, successfully overcame drug addiction to become of the country’s most heralded mothers. Her strength and life story inspired the work of her son, Tupac Shakur. His song “Dear Mama” remains the unofficial hip hop anthem on Mother’s Day. The song still makes me tear up thinking about the struggles moms go through for their kids — the sacrifices my own mom made for us.

After Tupac’s death, Afeni continued shaping lives by running her son’s estate and helped to shape his legacy. She led investments to communities and charities through the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation.

Twenty years after the death of her son, Afeni passed away this week.

On Mother’s Day, I’m celebrating Afeni and the mothers like her who are fighting injustices to improve the lives for their children and the next generation. Like the mothers of Flint.

I’m celebrating Desiree Dual, a mother and Flint resident that I met while touring the city with Green For All, the environmental justice non-profit that I lead. Desiree watched her children getting progressively sick from lead poisoning for months, and then one day stepped out of the shower to find blood coming out of her ears. Now, she’s spending her time organizing water deliveries for local residents and fighting for the resources for her pipes to be fixed as a member of Flint Rising — all while taking care of her sick children and her own health.

Melissa Mays along other Flint mothers

I’m also celebrating Melissa Mays, another Flint mother that founded an advocacy organization called “Water You Fighting For.” She told theHuffington Post that her resolve in fighting for justice in Flint is traced back to her status as a mother. “When you cross our babies, no. That’s not going to happen. Go with your gut,” she said. “It doesn’t matter what your background is. You can make a difference and make your voice heard. No one would be doing anything now if it wasn’t for a bunch of moms getting mad.”

My own mom was pregnant with me when escaping a war-torn Vietnam. We grew up in some of the poorest and most polluted communities in Oakland. When we finally settled down, it was in a neighborhood called “Murda Dubs” — appropriately named because it had some of the highest murders in the country during the mid-90s. Our neighbors were struggling to make ends meet for basic needs. The struggle of Flint’s mothers strikes painfully close to home.

I am now a mother of twin toddlers. We live in Oakland, in a community where residents are projected to live twelve years shorter than more affluent zip codes a few miles away. I grew up watching my parents struggle with many of the same environmental racism as Melissa and Desiree, and now I fight alongside them in Oakland.

Several years ago, my husband and I teamed up with other parents to found the Roses of Concrete School in East Oakland. The school was named after Tupac’s poem “The Rose That Grew from Concrete.” The song celebrates the tenacity of youth who reach for the sun despite growing up in a community with little resources.

Did you hear about the rose that grew from a crack in the concrete?
Provin nature’s laws wrong it learned how to walk without havin feet
Funny it seems but, by keepin its dreams
It, learned to breathe FRESH air
Long live the rose that grew from concrete
When no one else even cared
No one else even cared..
The rose that grew from concrete

As I reflect on my mom’s sacrifices, and try to have a modicum of Afeni’s tenacity and the strength of Flint’s mothers, I know that there is nothing stronger than a mother’s resolve to fight for our kids.

Let’s make sure that we are constantly celebrating the mothers that are carrying the water for this activism daily, and remember that we owe it to our kids to create a sustainable legacy.


The Million Person Project: Vien Truong

Short clip of Vien Truong's personal story of why she works on the environment. Vien is one of the most passionate and effective environmental justice leaders in the country. She is the Director of Green For All which is working to develop a green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty.

To watch the full video go here: storiesarepower.com.



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